BlackFacts Details

Sarah Gertrude Millin

Sarah Gertrude Millin , née Liebson (born March 19, 1888, Žagarė, Lithuania, Russian Empire—died July 6, 1968, Johannesburg, South Africa), South African writer whose novels deal with the problems of South African life.

Millin’s Russian Jewish parents immigrated to South Africa when she was an infant. She spent her childhood near the diamond fields at Kimberley and the river diggings at Barkly West, whose white, Coloured, and black communities provided the background for much of her writing. Her first novel, The Dark River (1920), was set around Barkly West. Others followed, but it was God’s Step-Children (1924; new ed. 1951)—dealing with the problems of four generations of a half-black, half-white (“Coloured”) family in South Africa—that established her reputation. With Mary Glenn (1925), a study of a mother’s reaction to her child’s disappearance, Millin became one of the most popular South African novelists in English, identified by a nervous, sharp, vivid, often almost staccato style. She also wrote biographies of Cecil Rhodes (1933; new ed. 1952) and General Jan C. Smuts (1936). In a few of her many novels she referred to actual events in South African history—e.g., The Coming of the Lord (1928), about a black “prophet” in the eastern Cape, and King of the Bastards (1949), on the life of the white chieftain Coenraad Buys. Men on a Voyage (1930) is a collection of essays; she also wrote a series of war diaries (1944–48) and two autobiographical books, The Night Is Long (1941) and The Measure of My Days (1955). Millin’s last novels were The Wizard Bird (1962) and Goodbye, Dear England (1965). Her literary reputation diminished after her death.

Cuisine Facts

Lifestyle Facts

Blackfacts BETA RELEASE 10.0.20
(Production Environment)