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Announcement of the death of former President Rawlings pic.twitter.com/7ext0fp4sd

— Nana Akufo-Addo (@NAkufoAddo) November 12, 2020

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","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Ghanaians poured praise on their former leader Jerry Rawlings who died on Thursday. Many eulogized him as a patriot and a democrat. \n\nPresident Nana Akufo-Addo ordered flags around the country to fly at half-mast, to mark seven days of national mourning from Friday. \n\n\nIt is with great sadness that I learnt of the passing of former president Jerry Rawlings of Ghana. Africa has lost a stalwart of Pan-Africanism and a charismatic continental statesman. My sincere condolences to his family, the people and the government of #Ghana\r\n— Moussa Faki Mahamat (@AUC_MoussaFaki) November 12, 2020 \n\nAnnouncement of the death of former President Rawlings pic.twitter.com/7ext0fp4sd\r\n— Nana Akufo-Addo (@NAkufoAddo) November 12, 2020 \n\n\nWatch our report:","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/11/307f8b1e-7abc-496f-804d-26ec6428ab00.jpg","ImageHeight":538,"ImageWidth":1024,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"42C8FAC1-E2C7-4A09-8CA5-16C843DEC99E","SourceName":"Africanews | Latest breaking news, daily news and African news from Africa","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.africanews.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"BECBE15C-72A7-4130-B8DB-A12EAF26B3AB","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"New York University","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/nyu-logo.jpg","SponsorUrl":"https://www.nyu.edu","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"date\":\"2020-11-13T08:54:11Z\"}","JsonExtData":{"date":{"ValueKind":3}},"Id":191201,"FactUId":"3C1FA344-8FB9-4FCB-AE73-DB5BD8678B5D","Slug":"a-patriot-tributes-pour-in-for-ghanas-ex-president-rawlings-africanews","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"'A patriot': Tributes pour in for Ghana's ex president Rawlings | Africanews","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/a-patriot-tributes-pour-in-for-ghanas-ex-president-rawlings-africanews","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/de2ecbf0-5aa4-45ce-bbf9-9a6ac45f6ac8/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blackpast.org%2F","DisplayText":"

The Faith Congregational Church in Hartford, Connecticut began in 1819 as a place for African Americans to worship on their own since they were previously only able to worship in the backs of churches and in church galleries in that city. A group of African Americans began worshipping in the conference room of the First Church of Christ in Hartford, Connecticut, which is now known as Center Church. This congregation moved to a building on State Street in 1820 and formed the first black Congregational Church in Connecticut and the third oldest in the nation. The church initially called itself the African American Religious Society of Hartford and vowed to create a place of worship where there would be no assigned seating and where anyone was welcome to worship. The congregation purchased property in 1826 where it built a stone-and-brick church on the corner of Talcott and Market Streets.

By the 1830s with the rise of the New England abolitionist movement, the church building became an anti-slavery meetinghouse. Popular lecturers spoke at the church in support of abolition, including Rev. Henry Highland Garnet and Arnold Buffman, former president of the New England Anti-Slavery Society. James Pennington, an early church minister and abolitionist, was himself a fugitive slave from Maryland.  Rev. Pennington and his congregation became supporters of the Amistad slave case in neighboring New Haven in 1839-1840 and fought for the release of the captured men, women, and children and their return to West Africa. The church also raised funds for the captives’ legal defense.

The church established a school in 1840, which served as the only place in Hartford where black children could obtain an education at that time. That same year, the congregation changed its name to First Hartford Colored Congregational Church. In 1860, another name change took place; the church became the Talcott Street Congregational Church and had several pastors until Rev. Robert F. Wheeler aided in the church’s stability and growing membership

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"The Faith Congregational Church in Hartford, Connecticut began in 1819 as a place for African Americans to worship on their own since they were previously only able to worship in the backs of churches and in church galleries in that city. A group of African Americans began worshipping in the conference room of the First Church of Christ in Hartford, Connecticut, which is now known as Center Church. This congregation moved to a building on State Street in 1820 and formed the first black Congregational Church in Connecticut and the third oldest in the nation. The church initially called itself the African American Religious Society of Hartford and vowed to create a place of worship where there would be no assigned seating and where anyone was welcome to worship. The congregation purchased property in 1826 where it built a stone-and-brick church on the corner of Talcott and Market Streets. \nBy the 1830s with the rise of the New England abolitionist movement, the church building became an anti-slavery meetinghouse. Popular lecturers spoke at the church in support of abolition, including Rev. Henry Highland Garnet and Arnold Buffman, former president of the New England Anti-Slavery Society. James Pennington, an early church minister and abolitionist, was himself a fugitive slave from Maryland.  Rev. Pennington and his congregation became supporters of the Amistad slave case in neighboring New Haven in 1839-1840 and fought for the release of the captured men, women, and children and their return to West Africa. The church also raised funds for the captives’ legal defense. \nThe church established a school in 1840, which served as the only place in Hartford where black children could obtain an education at that time. That same year, the congregation changed its name to First Hartford Colored Congregational Church. In 1860, another name change took place; the church became the Talcott Street Congregational Church and had several pastors until Rev. Robert F. Wheeler aided in the church’s stability and growing membership","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.blackpast.org/files/faith_congregational_church.jpg","ImageHeight":395,"ImageWidth":330,"ImageOrientation":"portrait","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"DE2ECBF0-5AA4-45CE-BBF9-9A6AC45F6AC8","SourceName":"Black Past","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.blackpast.org/","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":5052,"FactUId":"A624E2C7-5AE7-4463-9EFC-9469028E6442","Slug":"faith-congregational-church-hartford-1819","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Faith Congregational Church [Hartford] (1819- )","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/faith-congregational-church-hartford-1819","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/de2ecbf0-5aa4-45ce-bbf9-9a6ac45f6ac8/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blackpast.org%2F","DisplayText":"

Chartered in 1672, the Royal African Company was a royally chartered company which had a legally based monopoly on English trade to West Africa until 1698. The monopoly specifically extended through five thousand miles of the western coast from Cape Sallee (in contemporary Morocco) to the Cape of Good Hope (in what is now South Africa).

The Royal African Company traded mainly for gold and slaves (the majority of whom were sent to English colonies in the Americas). Headquarters were located at the Cape Coast Castle (located in modern-day Ghana). The Royal African Company also maintained many forts and factories in other locations such as Sierra Leone, the Slave Coast, the River Gambia, and additional areas on the Gold Coast.

The Royal African Company lost its monopoly in 1698, although it continued to engage in the slave trade until 1731. It was replaced by the Company of Merchants Trading to Africa in 1752.

Royally chartered companies like the Royal African Company were important tools in the opening of the African continent to slave trade and later imperial colonizing ambitions. The Royal African Company was the second such attempt by Parliament, as they had chartered the Royal Adventurers into Africa in 1660. This first attempt failed due to factors relating to a war with Holland.

Sources:

Alexander M. Zukas, “Chartered Companies,” in Encyclopedia of WesternColonialism since 1450 ed. Thomas Benjamin (Detroit: MacmillanReference USA, 2007); K.G. Davis, Royal African Company (London:Longmans, Green and Co., 1957); Robert Law, ed., The English in WestAfrica 1691-1699: The Local Correspondence of the Royal African Companyof England 1681-1699 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).

Contributor(s):

Bilow, Ali

University of Washington, Seattle

Entry Categories:

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Chartered in 1672, the Royal African Company was a royally chartered company which had a legally based monopoly on English trade to West Africa until 1698. The monopoly specifically extended through five thousand miles of the western coast from Cape Sallee (in contemporary Morocco) to the Cape of Good Hope (in what is now South Africa). \nThe Royal African Company traded mainly for gold and slaves (the majority of whom were sent to English colonies in the Americas). Headquarters were located at the Cape Coast Castle (located in modern-day Ghana). The Royal African Company also maintained many forts and factories in other locations such as Sierra Leone, the Slave Coast, the River Gambia, and additional areas on the Gold Coast.\nThe Royal African Company lost its monopoly in 1698, although it continued to engage in the slave trade until 1731. It was replaced by the Company of Merchants Trading to Africa in 1752.\nRoyally chartered companies like the Royal African Company were important tools in the opening of the African continent to slave trade and later imperial colonizing ambitions. The Royal African Company was the second such attempt by Parliament, as they had chartered the Royal Adventurers into Africa in 1660. This first attempt failed due to factors relating to a war with Holland.\nSources:\nAlexander M. Zukas, “Chartered Companies,” in Encyclopedia of WesternColonialism since 1450 ed. Thomas Benjamin (Detroit: MacmillanReference USA, 2007); K.G. Davis, Royal African Company (London:Longmans, Green and Co., 1957); Robert Law, ed., The English in WestAfrica 1691-1699: The Local Correspondence of the Royal African Companyof England 1681-1699 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).\nContributor(s):\nBilow, Ali \nUniversity of Washington, Seattle\nEntry Categories:","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.blackpast.org/files/blackpast_images/royal_african_company.jpg","ImageHeight":500,"ImageWidth":314,"ImageOrientation":"portrait","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"DE2ECBF0-5AA4-45CE-BBF9-9A6AC45F6AC8","SourceName":"Black Past","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.blackpast.org/","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":6183,"FactUId":"A719B58E-3E70-440E-B75A-5643AE441A78","Slug":"royal-african-company","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Royal African Company","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/royal-african-company","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/42c8fac1-e2c7-4a09-8ca5-16c843dec99e/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.africanews.com","DisplayText":"

Gunmen have attacked a security post in northern Ivory Coast near the border with Burkina Faso, killing at least 10 soldiers and injuring six others, Ivory Coast’s army chief said Thursday.

Thursday’s early morning assault targeted an army and gendarmerie post in Kafolo in Sikolo prefecture, according to a statement by Armed Forces Chief Lassina Doumbia.

In May, Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso launched joint operations along the border region.

Fighters affiliated with al-Qaida and the Islamic State group have staged a growing number of attacks and gained more territory in the past year in Burkina Faso, displacing more than 750,000 people in that country’s north.

There have been growing concerns over the possible presence of Islamic militants in Ivory Coast.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Gunmen have attacked a security post in northern Ivory Coast near the border with Burkina Faso, killing at least 10 soldiers and injuring six others, Ivory Coast’s army chief said Thursday.\r\n\r\nThursday’s early morning assault targeted an army and gendarmerie post in Kafolo in Sikolo prefecture, according to a statement by Armed Forces Chief Lassina Doumbia.\r\n\r\nIn May, Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso launched joint operations along the border region.\r\n\r\nFighters affiliated with al-Qaida and the Islamic State group have staged a growing number of attacks and gained more territory in the past year in Burkina Faso, displacing more than 750,000 people in that country’s north.\r\n\r\nThere have been growing concerns over the possible presence of Islamic militants in Ivory Coast.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/06/3590fd16-ee1b-4db6-ae77-a99e4fb573731.png","ImageHeight":788,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"42C8FAC1-E2C7-4A09-8CA5-16C843DEC99E","SourceName":"Africanews | Latest breaking news, daily news and African news from Africa","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.africanews.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-12T11:00:00Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":65428,"FactUId":"CF2E6AB3-E061-4DFD-B255-DE01954A9240","Slug":"terrorist-attack-in-northern-ivory-coast-kills-10-soldiers--govt","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Terrorist attack in northern Ivory Coast kills 10 soldiers - govt","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/terrorist-attack-in-northern-ivory-coast-kills-10-soldiers--govt","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/42c8fac1-e2c7-4a09-8ca5-16c843dec99e/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.africanews.com","DisplayText":"

Prosecutors sought Monday to overturn former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo’s acquittal last year on crimes against humanity charges stemming from his alleged role in post-election violence that killed 3,000 people nearly a decade ago.

Gbagbo and former Ivorian youth minister Charles Ble Goude have both been unable to return to the West African nation since their January 2019 acquittals under the terms of their release set by the International Criminal Court.

“In the second ground of appeal, the Prosecutor submits that the majority erred in law and/or procedure in acquitting Mr. Gbagbo and Mr. Blé Goude without properly articulating and consistently applying a clearly defined standard of proof or approach to assessing the sufficiency of the evidence at this stage, judge Chile Eboe-Osuji said.

In the second ground of appeal, the Prosecutor submits that the majority erred in law and/or procedure in acquitting Mr. Gbagbo and Mr. Blé Goude without properly articulating and consistently applying a clearly defined standard of proof or approach to assessing the sufficiency of the evidence at this stage.

In appealing that decision, the prosecutor’s office said that decision was “legally and procedurally defective such that it cannot have the legal effect of dismissing all charges against M. Gbagbo and Mr. Ble Goude.”

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Prosecutors sought Monday to overturn former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo’s acquittal last year on crimes against humanity charges stemming from his alleged role in post-election violence that killed 3,000 people nearly a decade ago.\r\n\r\nGbagbo and former Ivorian youth minister Charles Ble Goude have both been unable to return to the West African nation since their January 2019 acquittals under the terms of their release set by the International Criminal Court.\r\n\r\n“In the second ground of appeal, the Prosecutor submits that the majority erred in law and/or procedure in acquitting Mr. Gbagbo and Mr. Blé Goude without properly articulating and consistently applying a clearly defined standard of proof or approach to assessing the sufficiency of the evidence at this stage, judge Chile Eboe-Osuji said.\r\n\r\nIn the second ground of appeal, the Prosecutor submits that the majority erred in law and/or procedure in acquitting Mr. Gbagbo and Mr. Blé Goude without properly articulating and consistently applying a clearly defined standard of proof or approach to assessing the sufficiency of the evidence at this stage.\r\n\r\nIn appealing that decision, the prosecutor’s office said that decision was “legally and procedurally defective such that it cannot have the legal effect of dismissing all charges against M. Gbagbo and Mr. Ble Goude.”","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/06/4b437447-662a-41f4-8a3a-6aff6a3bd5391.png","ImageHeight":788,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"42C8FAC1-E2C7-4A09-8CA5-16C843DEC99E","SourceName":"Africanews | Latest breaking news, daily news and African news from Africa","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.africanews.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-23T08:00:00Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":71055,"FactUId":"37B39EF6-8297-493B-9A0A-E4C7B9A0068A","Slug":"icc-prosecutor-appeals-gbagbo-ble-goude-acquittal","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"ICC prosecutor appeals Gbagbo, Ble Goude acquittal","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/icc-prosecutor-appeals-gbagbo-ble-goude-acquittal","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/ba8cd304-6b2c-4c96-b969-a837090ad7f7/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com","DisplayText":"

The police chief called on Nigerians to join in efforts to tackle rape and other sexual violence by ensuring prompt report of cases and working with the police to apprehend the suspects.

\"I will call on every Nigerian that comes across any victim of sexual offences, rape or gender-based violence to quickly report to law enforcement agents because keeping quiet without reporting it will give room for the perpetrators to continue to commit the offences,\" he said.

\"It has come to the public knowledge now that because of the COVID-19 restrictions, we have a surge in cases of rape and gender-based violence.

These are cases that are now coming up but we want to let members of the public know that, rape and gender-based violence has been there.

\"The police and other security agencies and other Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) have been collaborating, to see to it that these cases of rape and gender-based violence are dealt with.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"The police chief called on Nigerians to join in efforts to tackle rape and other sexual violence by ensuring prompt report of cases and working with the police to apprehend the suspects.\r\n\r\n\"I will call on every Nigerian that comes across any victim of sexual offences, rape or gender-based violence to quickly report to law enforcement agents because keeping quiet without reporting it will give room for the perpetrators to continue to commit the offences,\" he said.\r\n\r\n\"It has come to the public knowledge now that because of the COVID-19 restrictions, we have a surge in cases of rape and gender-based violence.\r\n\r\nThese are cases that are now coming up but we want to let members of the public know that, rape and gender-based violence has been there.\r\n\r\n\"The police and other security agencies and other Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) have been collaborating, to see to it that these cases of rape and gender-based violence are dealt with.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/06/a304f8a0-b758-4fe6-a904-11b072aec24c1.png","ImageHeight":919,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"BA8CD304-6B2C-4C96-B969-A837090AD7F7","SourceName":"allAfrica.com","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://allafrica.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-15T15:19:29Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":66672,"FactUId":"F68BA068-4B72-4223-953B-1F1D081E31E9","Slug":"nigeria-records-717-rape-cases-in-five-months--official","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Nigeria Records 717 Rape Cases in Five Months - Official","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/nigeria-records-717-rape-cases-in-five-months--official","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/ba8cd304-6b2c-4c96-b969-a837090ad7f7/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com","DisplayText":"

The first term of Dr. Akinwunmi Adesina as the president of the African Development Bank (AfDB) came to an end in May 2020,  he is also due for re-election for a second term.

While the cost to income ratio of the bank is 41 per cent, the comparable figure for the World Bank is 113 per cent, meaning the African Development Bank(AfDB) is three times more efficient on its administrative costs compared to the World Bank.

The African Development Bank(AfDB), launched the Africa Investment Forum in 2018, in Johannesburg, South Africa.

The bank's High 5 strategic priorities: Light up and Power Africa; Feed Africa; Industrialise Africa; Integrate Africa; and Improve the quality of life of the people of Africa, have been acclaimed globally as the key for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in Africa and the Agenda 2063 of the African Union.

Following the approval of GCI-7,  bank expects to help African countries to achieve the following development results in the next 8 years:105 million people would get access to electricity, 204 million people would benefit from improved access to agricultural technologies to achieve food security,23 million people would benefit from investee private sector companies,252 million people would gain access to improved transportservices, and

128 million people would benefit from improved water and sanitation.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"The first term of Dr. Akinwunmi Adesina as the president of the African Development Bank (AfDB) came to an end in May 2020,  he is also due for re-election for a second term.\r\n\r\nWhile the cost to income ratio of the bank is 41 per cent, the comparable figure for the World Bank is 113 per cent, meaning the African Development Bank(AfDB) is three times more efficient on its administrative costs compared to the World Bank.\r\n\r\nThe African Development Bank(AfDB), launched the Africa Investment Forum in 2018, in Johannesburg, South Africa.\r\n\r\nThe bank's High 5 strategic priorities: Light up and Power Africa; Feed Africa; Industrialise Africa; Integrate Africa; and Improve the quality of life of the people of Africa, have been acclaimed globally as the key for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in Africa and the Agenda 2063 of the African Union.\r\n\r\nFollowing the approval of GCI-7,  bank expects to help African countries to achieve the following development results in the next 8 years:105 million people would get access to electricity, 204 million people would benefit from improved access to agricultural technologies to achieve food security,23 million people would benefit from investee private sector companies,252 million people would gain access to improved transportservices, and\n\n128 million people would benefit from improved water and sanitation.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"BA8CD304-6B2C-4C96-B969-A837090AD7F7","SourceName":"allAfrica.com","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://allafrica.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-15T17:50:09Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":66584,"FactUId":"D5F3C977-A8A2-408A-A328-9F6178DB5708","Slug":"africa-afdb-adesina-his-achievements-prospects-for-re-election","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Africa: AfDB: Adesina, His Achievements, Prospects For Re-election","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/africa-afdb-adesina-his-achievements-prospects-for-re-election","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/c1e5e647-184a-49fc-af93-4b85a727fac9/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fboston.naaap.org%2Fcpages%2Fhome","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/de2ecbf0-5aa4-45ce-bbf9-9a6ac45f6ac8/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blackpast.org%2F","DisplayText":"

Malcolm X’s life changed dramatically in the first six months of 1964.  On March 8, he left the Nation of Islam.  In May he toured West Africa and made a pilgrimage to Mecca, returning as El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz.  While in Ghana in May, he decided to form the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU).  Malcolm returned to New York the following month to create the OAAU and on June 28 gave his first public address on behalf of the new organization at the Audubon Ballroom in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan.  That address appears below.

Salaam Alaikum, Mr. Moderator, our distinguished guests, brothers and sisters, our friends and our enemies, everybody whos here.

As many of you know, last March when it was announced that I was no longer in the Black Muslim movement, it was pointed out that it was my intention to work among the 22 million non-Muslim Afro-Americans and to try and form some type of organization, or create a situation where the young people – our young people, the students and others – could study the problems of our people for a period of time and then come up with a new analysis and give us some new ideas and some new suggestions as to how to approach a problem that too many other people have been playing around with for too long. And that we would have some kind of meeting and determine at a later date whether to form a black nationalist party or a black nationalist army.

There have been many of our people across the country from all walks of life who have taken it upon themselves to try and pool their ideas and to come up with some kind of solution to the problem that confronts all of our people. And tonight we are here to try and get an understanding of what it is theyve come up with.

Also, recently when I was blessed to make a religious pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca where I met many people from all over the world, plus spent many weeks in Africa trying to broaden my own scope and get more of an open mind to look at the problem as it actually is, one of the things that I

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Malcolm X’s life changed dramatically in the first six months of 1964.  On March 8, he left the Nation of Islam.  In May he toured West Africa and made a pilgrimage to Mecca, returning as El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz.  While in Ghana in May, he decided to form the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU).  Malcolm returned to New York the following month to create the OAAU and on June 28 gave his first public address on behalf of the new organization at the Audubon Ballroom in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan.  That address appears below.\nSalaam Alaikum, Mr. Moderator, our distinguished guests, brothers and sisters, our friends and our enemies, everybody whos here. \nAs many of you know, last March when it was announced that I was no longer in the Black Muslim movement, it was pointed out that it was my intention to work among the 22 million non-Muslim Afro-Americans and to try and form some type of organization, or create a situation where the young people – our young people, the students and others – could study the problems of our people for a period of time and then come up with a new analysis and give us some new ideas and some new suggestions as to how to approach a problem that too many other people have been playing around with for too long. And that we would have some kind of meeting and determine at a later date whether to form a black nationalist party or a black nationalist army. \nThere have been many of our people across the country from all walks of life who have taken it upon themselves to try and pool their ideas and to come up with some kind of solution to the problem that confronts all of our people. And tonight we are here to try and get an understanding of what it is theyve come up with. \nAlso, recently when I was blessed to make a religious pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca where I met many people from all over the world, plus spent many weeks in Africa trying to broaden my own scope and get more of an open mind to look at the problem as it actually is, one of the things that I","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.blackpast.org/files/blackpast_images/malcolm_x.jpg","ImageHeight":300,"ImageWidth":223,"ImageOrientation":"portrait","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"DE2ECBF0-5AA4-45CE-BBF9-9A6AC45F6AC8","SourceName":"Black Past","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.blackpast.org/","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"C1E5E647-184A-49FC-AF93-4B85A727FAC9","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"National Association of Asian American Professionals (NAAP) Boston Chapter","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/naaap-logo.png","SponsorUrl":"https://boston.naaap.org/cpages/home","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":7197,"FactUId":"DC4B3BA6-2640-48F7-8C27-9C8A25E38AD0","Slug":"1964-malcolm-x-s-speech-at-the-founding-rally-of-the-organization-of-afro-american-unity","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"(1964) Malcolm X’s Speech at the Founding Rally of the Organization of Afro-American Unity","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/1964-malcolm-x-s-speech-at-the-founding-rally-of-the-organization-of-afro-american-unity","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/c996ac0a-d532-48f6-89c4-79eaf9e982f6/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.factmonster.com%2Fblack-history-month-activities-history-timeline-ideas-events-facts-quizzes","DisplayText":"

Namibia is bordered on the north by Angola and Zambia, on the east by Botswana, and on the east and south by South Africa. It is for the most part a portion of the high plateau of southern Africa, with a general elevation of from 3,000 to 4,000 ft.

Republic.

The San peoples may have inhabited what is now Namibia more than 2,000 years ago. The Bantu-speaking Herero settled there in the 1600s. The Ovambo, the largest ethnic group today, migrated in the 1800s.

In the late 15th century, the Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias became the first European to visit Namibia. Formerly called South-West Africa, the territory became a German colony in 1884. Between 1904 and 1908, German troops massacred tens of thousands of Herero, who had revolted against colonial rule. In 1915, during World War I, Namibian territory was taken over by South African forces. In 1921, it became a mandated territory of the League of Nations, under the administration of South Africa.

Upon the dissolution of the League of Nations in 1946, South Africa refused to accept United Nations authority to replace its mandate with a UN trusteeship. A black Marxist separatist group, the South West African Peoples Organization (SWAPO), formed in 1960 and began small-scale guerrilla attacks aimed at achieving independence. In 1966, the UN called for South Africas withdrawal from the territory, and officially renamed it Namibia in 1968. South Africa refused to obey. Under a 1974 Security Council resolution, South Africa was required to begin the transfer of power or face UN action. Prime Minister Balthazar J. Vorster rejected UN supervision, claiming that his government was prepared to negotiate Namibian independence, but not with SWAPO, which the UN had recognized as the “sole legitimate representative” of the Namibian people.

South Africa handed over limited powers to a new multiracial administration in 1985 (the previous government had enforced South Africas apartheid laws). Installation of this government ended South Africas direct rule, but it

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Namibia is bordered on the north by Angola and Zambia, on the east by Botswana, and on the east and south by South Africa. It is for the most part a portion of the high plateau of southern Africa, with a general elevation of from 3,000 to 4,000 ft.\nRepublic.\nThe San peoples may have inhabited what is now Namibia more than 2,000 years ago. The Bantu-speaking Herero settled there in the 1600s. The Ovambo, the largest ethnic group today, migrated in the 1800s.\nIn the late 15th century, the Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias became the first European to visit Namibia. Formerly called South-West Africa, the territory became a German colony in 1884. Between 1904 and 1908, German troops massacred tens of thousands of Herero, who had revolted against colonial rule. In 1915, during World War I, Namibian territory was taken over by South African forces. In 1921, it became a mandated territory of the League of Nations, under the administration of South Africa.\nUpon the dissolution of the League of Nations in 1946, South Africa refused to accept United Nations authority to replace its mandate with a UN trusteeship. A black Marxist separatist group, the South West African Peoples Organization (SWAPO), formed in 1960 and began small-scale guerrilla attacks aimed at achieving independence. In 1966, the UN called for South Africas withdrawal from the territory, and officially renamed it Namibia in 1968. South Africa refused to obey. Under a 1974 Security Council resolution, South Africa was required to begin the transfer of power or face UN action. Prime Minister Balthazar J. Vorster rejected UN supervision, claiming that his government was prepared to negotiate Namibian independence, but not with SWAPO, which the UN had recognized as the “sole legitimate representative” of the Namibian people.\nSouth Africa handed over limited powers to a new multiracial administration in 1985 (the previous government had enforced South Africas apartheid laws). Installation of this government ended South Africas direct rule, but it","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.factmonster.com/sites/factmonster-com/files/public-3a/namibia.gif","ImageHeight":154,"ImageWidth":250,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"C996AC0A-D532-48F6-89C4-79EAF9E982F6","SourceName":"Fact Monster - Black History","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.factmonster.com/black-history-month-activities-history-timeline-ideas-events-facts-quizzes","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":4349,"FactUId":"11231E30-C42F-4AFE-8C8C-BF4EBF435D8F","Slug":"namibia","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Namibia","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/namibia","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/05f41a69-179a-47bc-8508-7c9d7a53954a/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.maah.org%20","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/845353a9-d72a-4d1b-862e-ee01708fb5d5/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fnewpittsburghcourier.com","DisplayText":"

Clinton’s primary challenger, Democratic socialist, Bernie Sanders, endorsed her, but Sanders had a difficult time getting his diehard supporters to do the same.

In response to this rebellion, Sanders told his supporters the movement has to grow inside the Democratic Party, not outside of it.

(2016 Pennsylvania vote count…Clinton: 47.85 percent; 2,926,441—Trump: (48.58 percent; 2,970,733)

In 2016 Sanders was unable to hand over his Democratic socialist movement to Hillary Clinton and in 2020 Sanders is struggling to hand it over to Democratic Presidential nominee Joe Biden.

The “Old New Left” wrote, “We are gravely concerned that some (Bernie Supporters), including the leadership of the Democratic Socialists of America, refuse to support Biden, whom they see as a representative of Wall Street… Some of us think “endorsing” Joe Biden is a step too far; but we who now write this open letter all know we must work hard to elect him.

The editor of the Jacobin Magazine (which offers socialist perspectives on politics, economics, and culture) declared he was voting for the Green Party candidate, and took issue with the “Old New Left” haranguing young socialist.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Clinton’s primary challenger, Democratic socialist, Bernie Sanders, endorsed her, but Sanders had a difficult time getting his diehard supporters to do the same.\r\n\r\nIn response to this rebellion, Sanders told his supporters the movement has to grow inside the Democratic Party, not outside of it.\r\n\r\n(2016 Pennsylvania vote count…Clinton: 47.85 percent; 2,926,441—Trump: (48.58 percent; 2,970,733)\n\nIn 2016 Sanders was unable to hand over his Democratic socialist movement to Hillary Clinton and in 2020 Sanders is struggling to hand it over to Democratic Presidential nominee Joe Biden.\r\n\r\nThe “Old New Left” wrote, “We are gravely concerned that some (Bernie Supporters), including the leadership of the Democratic Socialists of America, refuse to support Biden, whom they see as a representative of Wall Street… Some of us think “endorsing” Joe Biden is a step too far; but we who now write this open letter all know we must work hard to elect him.\r\n\r\nThe editor of the Jacobin Magazine (which offers socialist perspectives on politics, economics, and culture) declared he was voting for the Green Party candidate, and took issue with the “Old New Left” haranguing young socialist.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/05/c49e7f1a-f64d-4b95-8db3-1b7d2231053b1.png","ImageHeight":945,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"845353A9-D72A-4D1B-862E-EE01708FB5D5","SourceName":"New Pittsburgh Courier - Powered by Real Times Media","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://newpittsburghcourier.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"05F41A69-179A-47BC-8508-7C9D7A53954A","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"Museum of African American History in Massachusetts","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/maah-logo.jpg","SponsorUrl":"https://www.maah.org ","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-23T14:17:20Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":56854,"FactUId":"D9327529-B275-40EE-9578-8E127547C41A","Slug":"the-new-new-left-is-just-as-stubborn-as-the-old-new-left","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"The ‘New New Left’ is just as stubborn as the ‘Old New left’","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/the-new-new-left-is-just-as-stubborn-as-the-old-new-left","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/05f41a69-179a-47bc-8508-7c9d7a53954a/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.maah.org%20","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/c996ac0a-d532-48f6-89c4-79eaf9e982f6/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.factmonster.com%2Fblack-history-month-activities-history-timeline-ideas-events-facts-quizzes","DisplayText":"

Lying on the Atlantic in the southern part of West Africa, Liberia is bordered by Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Côte dIvoire. It is comparable in size to Tennessee. Most of the country is a plateau covered by dense tropical forests, which thrive under an annual rainfall of about 160 in. a year.

Republic.

Africas first republic, Liberia was founded in 1822 as a result of the efforts of the American Colonization Society to settle freed American slaves in West Africa. The society contended that the emigration of blacks to Africa was an answer to the problem of slavery and the incompatibility of the races. Over the course of forty years, about 12,000 slaves were voluntarily relocated. Originally called Monrovia, the colony became the Free and Independent Republic of Liberia in 1847.

The English-speaking Americo-Liberians, descendants of former American slaves, make up only 5% of the population, but have historically dominated the intellectual and ruling class. Liberias indigenous population is composed of 16 different ethnic groups.

The government of Africas first republic was modeled after that of the United States, and Joseph Jenkins Roberts of Virginia was elected the first president. Ironically, Liberias constitution denied indigenous Liberians equal to the lighter-skinned American immigrants and their descendants.

After 1920, considerable progress was made toward opening up the interior of the country, a process that facilitated by the 1951 establishment of a 43-mile (69-km) railroad to the Bomi Hills from Monrovia. In July 1971, while serving his sixth term as president, William V. S. Tubman died following surgery and was succeeded by his longtime associate, Vice President William R. Tolbert, Jr.

Tolbert was ousted in a military coup on April 12, 1980, by Master Sgt. Samuel K. Doe, backed by the U.S. government. Does rule was characterized by corruption and brutality. A rebellion led by Charles Taylor, a former Doe aide, and the National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL), started in Dec. 1989; the following

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Lying on the Atlantic in the southern part of West Africa, Liberia is bordered by Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Côte dIvoire. It is comparable in size to Tennessee. Most of the country is a plateau covered by dense tropical forests, which thrive under an annual rainfall of about 160 in. a year.\nRepublic.\nAfricas first republic, Liberia was founded in 1822 as a result of the efforts of the American Colonization Society to settle freed American slaves in West Africa. The society contended that the emigration of blacks to Africa was an answer to the problem of slavery and the incompatibility of the races. Over the course of forty years, about 12,000 slaves were voluntarily relocated. Originally called Monrovia, the colony became the Free and Independent Republic of Liberia in 1847.\nThe English-speaking Americo-Liberians, descendants of former American slaves, make up only 5% of the population, but have historically dominated the intellectual and ruling class. Liberias indigenous population is composed of 16 different ethnic groups.\nThe government of Africas first republic was modeled after that of the United States, and Joseph Jenkins Roberts of Virginia was elected the first president. Ironically, Liberias constitution denied indigenous Liberians equal to the lighter-skinned American immigrants and their descendants.\nAfter 1920, considerable progress was made toward opening up the interior of the country, a process that facilitated by the 1951 establishment of a 43-mile (69-km) railroad to the Bomi Hills from Monrovia. In July 1971, while serving his sixth term as president, William V. S. Tubman died following surgery and was succeeded by his longtime associate, Vice President William R. Tolbert, Jr.\nTolbert was ousted in a military coup on April 12, 1980, by Master Sgt. Samuel K. Doe, backed by the U.S. government. Does rule was characterized by corruption and brutality. A rebellion led by Charles Taylor, a former Doe aide, and the National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL), started in Dec. 1989; the following","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.factmonster.com/sites/factmonster-com/files/public-3a/liberia.gif","ImageHeight":154,"ImageWidth":250,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"C996AC0A-D532-48F6-89C4-79EAF9E982F6","SourceName":"Fact Monster - Black History","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.factmonster.com/black-history-month-activities-history-timeline-ideas-events-facts-quizzes","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"05F41A69-179A-47BC-8508-7C9D7A53954A","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"Museum of African American History in Massachusetts","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/maah-logo.jpg","SponsorUrl":"https://www.maah.org ","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":"1980-04-12T00:00:00","HasEffectiveDate":true,"MonthAbbrevName":"Apr","FormattedDate":"April 12, 1980","Year":1980,"Month":4,"Day":12,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":" {\"Date\":\"1980-04-12\"}","JsonExtData":{"date":{"ValueKind":3}},"Id":6149,"FactUId":"21471EAC-FC3D-471F-8400-D3BED6DD07EE","Slug":"liberia-3","FactType":"Event","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Liberia","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/liberia-3","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/42c8fac1-e2c7-4a09-8ca5-16c843dec99e/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.africanews.com","DisplayText":"

May 19: govt to explain boom recoveries and address hot spot case management

\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,918 (new cases = 183)

Total recoveries = 1,754 (new = 0)

Total deaths = 31 (new = 2)

Active cases = 4,137

\tFigures valid as of May 19, 2020

\t

\tNo new figures were released on Monday but the government through the Information Ministry will release new tallies at a press conference scheduled for later today.

May 17: 5,735 cases, prez fact-checked on testing ‘record’

\tTotal confirmed cases = 5735 (new cases = 97)

Total recoveries = 1,754 (new = 294)

Total deaths = 29 (new = 5)

Active cases = 3,952

\tFigures valid as of close of day May 16, 2020

\tGhana maintained her spot as West Africa’s most impacted after the Health Ministry released latest figures yesterday.

AFP Fact-check – Ghana’s leader falsely claims his country fronts COVID-19 testing

May 16: 5,530 cases, jumbo recoveries

\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,638 (new cases = 108)

Total recoveries = 1,460 (new recoveries = 1086)

Total deaths = 24 (new deaths = 0)

Active cases = 4,150

\tGhana recorded a boost in recoveries with a record 1,086 discharges authorities reported early Saturday.

READ MORE – Uniting behind a people’s vaccine against COVID-19

\t

May 14: 5,530 cases, 13 of 16 regions infected

\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,530 (new cases = 122)

Total recoveries = 674 (new recoveries = 160)

Total deaths = 24 (new deaths = 0)

Active cases = 4,832

\tThirteen of the 16 regions in the country have recorded cases of the disease.

Statistics as at close of day May 13, 2020

\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,408 (new cases = 281)

Total recoveries = 514

Total deaths = 24

Active cases = 4,872

May 12: Cases hit 5,127; gold-rich Obuasi new hotspot

\tGhana’s case statistics passed the 5,000 mark after 427 new cases were recorded according to head of the Ghana Health Service, Dr. Aboagye.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"May 19: govt to explain boom recoveries and address hot spot case management\n\n\n\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,918 (new cases = 183)\n\nTotal recoveries = 1,754 (new = 0)\n\nTotal deaths = 31 (new = 2)\n\nActive cases = 4,137\n\n\n\tFigures valid as of May 19, 2020\n\n\n\t \n\n\tNo new figures were released on Monday but the government through the Information Ministry will release new tallies at a press conference scheduled for later today.\r\n\r\nMay 17: 5,735 cases, prez fact-checked on testing ‘record’ \n\n\n\tTotal confirmed cases = 5735 (new cases = 97)\n\nTotal recoveries = 1,754 (new = 294)\n\nTotal deaths = 29 (new = 5)\n\nActive cases = 3,952\n\n\n\tFigures valid as of close of day May 16, 2020\n\n\n\tGhana maintained her spot as West Africa’s most impacted after the Health Ministry released latest figures yesterday.\r\n\r\nAFP Fact-check – Ghana’s leader falsely claims his country fronts COVID-19 testing\n\n\n May 16: 5,530 cases, jumbo recoveries \n\n\n\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,638 (new cases = 108)\n\nTotal recoveries = 1,460 (new recoveries = 1086)\n\nTotal deaths = 24 (new deaths = 0)\n\nActive cases = 4,150\n\n\n\tGhana recorded a boost in recoveries with a record 1,086 discharges authorities reported early Saturday.\r\n\r\nREAD MORE – Uniting behind a people’s vaccine against COVID-19\n\n\n\t \n\n May 14: 5,530 cases, 13 of 16 regions infected \n\n\n\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,530 (new cases = 122)\n\nTotal recoveries = 674 (new recoveries = 160)\n\nTotal deaths = 24 (new deaths = 0)\n\nActive cases = 4,832\n\n\n\tThirteen of the 16 regions in the country have recorded cases of the disease.\r\n\r\nStatistics as at close of day May 13, 2020\n\n\n\tTotal confirmed cases = 5,408 (new cases = 281)\n\nTotal recoveries = 514\n\nTotal deaths = 24\n\nActive cases = 4,872\n\n\n May 12: Cases hit 5,127; gold-rich Obuasi new hotspot \n\n\n\tGhana’s case statistics passed the 5,000 mark after 427 new cases were recorded according to head of the Ghana Health Service, Dr. Aboagye.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/05/bc4e015c-9ebe-464f-a4e1-064fddbcd7151.png","ImageHeight":788,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"42C8FAC1-E2C7-4A09-8CA5-16C843DEC99E","SourceName":"Africanews | Latest breaking news, daily news and African news from Africa","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.africanews.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-19T09:40:00Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":54580,"FactUId":"38FE3463-676A-4AAD-901A-5C03A61F6A57","Slug":"ghana-coronavirus-5-918-cases-update-on-hot-spots-jumbo-recoveries-awaited","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Ghana coronavirus: 5,918 cases, update on hot spots, jumbo recoveries awaited","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/ghana-coronavirus-5-918-cases-update-on-hot-spots-jumbo-recoveries-awaited","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/ba8cd304-6b2c-4c96-b969-a837090ad7f7/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com","DisplayText":"

On the other hand, I was very sad that it was the first Eid I did not celebrate with my children and wife or friends,” Kulmiye said.

Instead, of wearing new clothes and shoes, as Muslims usually do on Eid, Kulmiye was in his protective gear to help patients recovering from COVID-19 at the isolation center.

“To at least revive the spirit of the Eid, we had breakfast and lunch together, of course in our protective gear, at our isolation center, and we invited COVID-19 patients who have recovered.

Also, we sang Eid songs for the lonely patients at the center who, like us, could not be with their families and friends,” Kulmiye added.

Fardowso Mohamed Hassan, a 27-year-old nurse, was on duty at the isolation center and marked Eid away from her husband.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"On the other hand, I was very sad that it was the first Eid I did not celebrate with my children and wife or friends,” Kulmiye said.\r\n\r\nInstead, of wearing new clothes and shoes, as Muslims usually do on Eid, Kulmiye was in his protective gear to help patients recovering from COVID-19 at the isolation center.\r\n\r\n“To at least revive the spirit of the Eid, we had breakfast and lunch together, of course in our protective gear, at our isolation center, and we invited COVID-19 patients who have recovered.\r\n\r\nAlso, we sang Eid songs for the lonely patients at the center who, like us, could not be with their families and friends,” Kulmiye added.\r\n\r\nFardowso Mohamed Hassan, a 27-year-old nurse, was on duty at the isolation center and marked Eid away from her husband.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"BA8CD304-6B2C-4C96-B969-A837090AD7F7","SourceName":"allAfrica.com","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://allafrica.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-25T08:36:18Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":58601,"FactUId":"DB5A4971-AE00-428C-8F0F-7877802ECAC2","Slug":"somalia-many-medics-chose-caring-for-covid-patients-over-marking-eid","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Somalia: Many Medics Chose Caring for COVID Patients Over Marking Eid","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/somalia-many-medics-chose-caring-for-covid-patients-over-marking-eid","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/e1937d8b-561e-4826-8d6e-da76009d44da/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cristoreyny.org","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/80689a34-9b7c-4d3a-91f8-56cabb44f365/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.britannica.com%2Fsearch%3Fquery%3Dblack%2520history","DisplayText":"

Davidson Nicol , in full Davidson Sylvester Hector Willoughby Nicol, also called Abioseh Nicol (born Sept. 14, 1924, Freetown, Sierra Leone—died Sept. 20, 1994, Cambridge, Eng.), Sierra Leonean diplomat, physician, medical researcher, and writer whose short stories and poems are among the best to have come out of West Africa.

Nicol was educated in medicine and natural sciences in Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and England, and he subsequently served in various medical posts in those countries. He became known for his research into the structure of insulin, and he lectured and wrote widely on medical topics. He was principal of Fourah Bay College, Freetown (1960–68), vice chancellor of the University of Sierra Leone (1966–68), and his country’s ambassador to the United Nations (1969–71). Nicol was president of the UN Security Council in 1970, and from 1972 to 1982 he served as executive director of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). He was president of the World Federation of UN Associations from 1983 to 1987.

Nicol’s short stories were published in Two African Tales (1965) and The Truly Married Woman, and Other Stories (1965), under the name Abioseh Nicol. They centre upon life in the government service and upon the interaction of Africans with colonial administrators in preindependent Sierra Leone. His short stories and poems appeared in anthologies and journals. He also wrote Africa, A Subjective View (1964) and edited several other nonfiction works.

Nicol from 1957 was a fellow of his college at the University of Cambridge, the first African to be so named at either Cambridge or Oxford.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Davidson Nicol , in full Davidson Sylvester Hector Willoughby Nicol, also called Abioseh Nicol (born Sept. 14, 1924, Freetown, Sierra Leone—died Sept. 20, 1994, Cambridge, Eng.), Sierra Leonean diplomat, physician, medical researcher, and writer whose short stories and poems are among the best to have come out of West Africa.\nNicol was educated in medicine and natural sciences in Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and England, and he subsequently served in various medical posts in those countries. He became known for his research into the structure of insulin, and he lectured and wrote widely on medical topics. He was principal of Fourah Bay College, Freetown (1960–68), vice chancellor of the University of Sierra Leone (1966–68), and his country’s ambassador to the United Nations (1969–71). Nicol was president of the UN Security Council in 1970, and from 1972 to 1982 he served as executive director of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). He was president of the World Federation of UN Associations from 1983 to 1987.\nNicol’s short stories were published in Two African Tales (1965) and The Truly Married Woman, and Other Stories (1965), under the name Abioseh Nicol. They centre upon life in the government service and upon the interaction of Africans with colonial administrators in preindependent Sierra Leone. His short stories and poems appeared in anthologies and journals. He also wrote Africa, A Subjective View (1964) and edited several other nonfiction works.\nNicol from 1957 was a fellow of his college at the University of Cambridge, the first African to be so named at either Cambridge or Oxford.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/media1.britannica.com/eb-media/51/73451-004-db661a13.jpg","ImageHeight":400,"ImageWidth":564,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"80689A34-9B7C-4D3A-91F8-56CABB44F365","SourceName":"Brittanica","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.britannica.com/search?query=black%20history","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"E1937D8B-561E-4826-8D6E-DA76009D44DA","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"Christo Rey New York High School","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/christorey-logo.jpg","SponsorUrl":"https://www.cristoreyny.org","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":10327,"FactUId":"5CDEA514-1B16-4C79-8193-1D49EE96782C","Slug":"davidson-nicol","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Davidson Nicol","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/davidson-nicol","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/0259fe31-15b2-475e-8f78-c20b48d0442b/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nababoston.org%2F","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/42c8fac1-e2c7-4a09-8ca5-16c843dec99e/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.africanews.com","DisplayText":"

Defeaning vuvuzelas and party songs took over Ghana's capital Accra on Saturday, the final day of campaigning ahead of presidential and parliamentary elections.

Twelve candidates, including three women, are vying for the west African nation's top job, but Monday's vote is essentially a fight between President Nana Akufo-Addo, 76, and former head of state John Mahama.

The city centre was plastered with billboards and posters and flags at every corner.

Akufo-Addo, running for a second term, drove through the shanty town of Nima, making whistle stops to acknowledge mammoth crowds clad in T-shirts of the governing New Patriotic Party (NPP).

\"It’s a done deal. It’s clear. The crowd says it all. Four more (years) for Nana,\" a party supporter, Dauda Faisal said.

Defying all COVID-19 protocols -– with just a handful wearing face masks -- the ecstatic crowd waved miniature flags as the president headed towards the rally grounds where he was due to address supporters.

Opposition leader John Mahama meanwhile kicked off his final day of campaigning by meeting local chiefs and labour union leaders, assuring them of more jobs if he won the December 7 election.

Mahama, 62, who has been campaigning hard for months, was expected later in the evening at a rally organised by his party, the National Democratic Congress (NDC).

More than 17 million people are registered to vote in the nation's eighth poll since it returned to democracy nearly 30 years ago.

This is the third time that Akufo-Addo and Mahama are running against each other, and the race is expected to be very close.

Results could be announced within 24 hours after the polls close.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Defeaning vuvuzelas and party songs took over Ghana's capital Accra on Saturday, the final day of campaigning ahead of presidential and parliamentary elections. \n\nTwelve candidates, including three women, are vying for the west African nation's top job, but Monday's vote is essentially a fight between President Nana Akufo-Addo, 76, and former head of state John Mahama. \n\nThe city centre was plastered with billboards and posters and flags at every corner. \n\nAkufo-Addo, running for a second term, drove through the shanty town of Nima, making whistle stops to acknowledge mammoth crowds clad in T-shirts of the governing New Patriotic Party (NPP). \n\n\"It’s a done deal. It’s clear. The crowd says it all. Four more (years) for Nana,\" a party supporter, Dauda Faisal said. \n\nDefying all COVID-19 protocols -– with just a handful wearing face masks -- the ecstatic crowd waved miniature flags as the president headed towards the rally grounds where he was due to address supporters. \n\nOpposition leader John Mahama meanwhile kicked off his final day of campaigning by meeting local chiefs and labour union leaders, assuring them of more jobs if he won the December 7 election. \n\nMahama, 62, who has been campaigning hard for months, was expected later in the evening at a rally organised by his party, the National Democratic Congress (NDC). \n\nMore than 17 million people are registered to vote in the nation's eighth poll since it returned to democracy nearly 30 years ago. \n\nThis is the third time that Akufo-Addo and Mahama are running against each other, and the race is expected to be very close. \n\nResults could be announced within 24 hours after the polls close.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/12/8e2e3741-6ad2-4eea-a73e-90536b8cccbd.jpg","ImageHeight":538,"ImageWidth":1024,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"42C8FAC1-E2C7-4A09-8CA5-16C843DEC99E","SourceName":"Africanews | Latest breaking news, daily news and African news from Africa","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.africanews.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"0259FE31-15B2-475E-8F78-C20B48D0442B","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"National Association of Black Accountants (NABA) Boston Metropolitan Chapter","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/naba-logo.png","SponsorUrl":"https://www.nababoston.org/","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"date\":\"2020-12-06T10:05:17Z\"}","JsonExtData":{"date":{"ValueKind":3}},"Id":211683,"FactUId":"F1A597A0-9786-4E70-93F8-0830EC63E642","Slug":"campaigning-ends-in-ghana-ahead-general-elections-africanews","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Campaigning ends in Ghana ahead general elections | Africanews","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/campaigning-ends-in-ghana-ahead-general-elections-africanews","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/e42d645b-ba17-4d13-bfc2-d2671a5dbf45/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nsbeboston.org%2F","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/08d2ee7c-809d-434b-917c-d2d660d50af2/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.theeastafrican.co.ke","DisplayText":"

A plucky young girl in West Africa tells the story of her growing up in the novel Of Women and Frogs by Bisi Adjapon.

Esi lives a happy life in Lagos with her Ghanaian father, Nigerian mother and younger brother.

Over the years we follow Esi as she blossoms into a young woman.

Of Women and Frogs traverses the coming of age experiences of young African women and Esi’s feelings and frustrations are relatable.

In tracing Esi’s journey into adulthood Adjapon boldly explores the hard choices confronting African girls and covert topics such as unwanted pregnancies, back-alley abortions, masturbation and same sex relationships in boarding schools.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"A plucky young girl in West Africa tells the story of her growing up in the novel Of Women and Frogs by Bisi Adjapon.\r\n\r\nEsi lives a happy life in Lagos with her Ghanaian father, Nigerian mother and younger brother.\r\n\r\nOver the years we follow Esi as she blossoms into a young woman.\r\n\r\nOf Women and Frogs traverses the coming of age experiences of young African women and Esi’s feelings and frustrations are relatable.\r\n\r\nIn tracing Esi’s journey into adulthood Adjapon boldly explores the hard choices confronting African girls and covert topics such as unwanted pregnancies, back-alley abortions, masturbation and same sex relationships in boarding schools.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"08D2EE7C-809D-434B-917C-D2D660D50AF2","SourceName":"The East African","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"E42D645B-BA17-4D13-BFC2-D2671A5DBF45","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"NSBE Boston","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/nsbe-logo.png","SponsorUrl":"https://www.nsbeboston.org/","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-26T09:41:00Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":58210,"FactUId":"5AD63AD4-EBD2-4959-92F5-1F6AEFEDA328","Slug":"book-review-the-witty-adolescence-of-an-african-girl","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"BOOK REVIEW: The witty adolescence of an African girl","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/book-review-the-witty-adolescence-of-an-african-girl","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/7b933ae8-03cd-4cb2-9499-82145e19cfcf/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.newsday.co.zw","DisplayText":"

THE ruling Zanu PF has failed to deal with Zimbabwe’s multifaceted crisis as the socio-economic situation continues to deteriorate since 2018 elections, a survey has shown.

According to a report on citizens’ perceptions and expectations titled Dancing on the Same Spot by SIVIO Institute, an independent organisation focused on ensuring that citizens are at the centre of processes of economic-political-social and policy change, the socio-economic crisis has worsened with no prospects of a turnaround in the immediate future.

It noted that the opposition MDC Alliance has also failed to deliver on its promises in local authorities they run, but added that the opposition party has continuously shifted the blame on Zanu PF, accusing the governing party of interference.

We have been tracking how the promises made by Zanu PF during the elections have been converted into policy programmes,” the report read.

This government still has a lot of work to convince its own citizens and also the international community that they are actually about reforms and turning around the fortunes of the countries,” the report read.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"THE ruling Zanu PF has failed to deal with Zimbabwe’s multifaceted crisis as the socio-economic situation continues to deteriorate since 2018 elections, a survey has shown.\r\n\r\nAccording to a report on citizens’ perceptions and expectations titled Dancing on the Same Spot by SIVIO Institute, an independent organisation focused on ensuring that citizens are at the centre of processes of economic-political-social and policy change, the socio-economic crisis has worsened with no prospects of a turnaround in the immediate future.\r\n\r\nIt noted that the opposition MDC Alliance has also failed to deliver on its promises in local authorities they run, but added that the opposition party has continuously shifted the blame on Zanu PF, accusing the governing party of interference.\r\n\r\nWe have been tracking how the promises made by Zanu PF during the elections have been converted into policy programmes,” the report read.\r\n\r\nThis government still has a lot of work to convince its own citizens and also the international community that they are actually about reforms and turning around the fortunes of the countries,” the report read.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"7B933AE8-03CD-4CB2-9499-82145E19CFCF","SourceName":"NewsDay Zimbabwe - Everyday News for Everyday People","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.newsday.co.zw","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-26T06:00:21Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":58073,"FactUId":"E9C93821-C11D-498A-853D-9E99651CE4B8","Slug":"zim-in-gridlock-under-ed","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"‘Zim in gridlock under ED’","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/zim-in-gridlock-under-ed","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":false,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/c1e5e647-184a-49fc-af93-4b85a727fac9/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fboston.naaap.org%2Fcpages%2Fhome","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/21e4edce-7619-462b-881d-d6a8b0bcd63f/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fgreenecodemocrat.com","DisplayText":"","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/06/67fbd4e1-484e-444d-91ea-e0b15658de391.png","ImageHeight":844,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"21E4EDCE-7619-462B-881D-D6A8B0BCD63F","SourceName":"Greene County Democrat | Serving Greene County Like No Other Newspaper","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://greenecodemocrat.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"C1E5E647-184A-49FC-AF93-4B85A727FAC9","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"National Association of Asian American Professionals (NAAP) Boston Chapter","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/naaap-logo.png","SponsorUrl":"https://boston.naaap.org/cpages/home","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-17T17:22:16Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":69280,"FactUId":"2E798195-BFE6-4C13-B6DA-CE43794BF2D6","Slug":"newswire-black-lives-matter-protesters-tear-down-statue-of-the-u-k-s-leading-slave-trader","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Newswire: Black Lives Matter protesters tear down statue of the U.K.’s leading slave trader","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/newswire-black-lives-matter-protesters-tear-down-statue-of-the-u-k-s-leading-slave-trader","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/8ae22336-2ffa-41c4-8efe-ec5c03161e26/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.charlestonchronicle.net","DisplayText":"

But now the contraction in the Chinese economy has paused the illegal logging in the Outamba-Kilimi national park – more than 1,100 square km of park protected by 27 unarmed rangers.

“No Chinese men are coming here anymore, and they’re the only people to come here and help us by buying what we cut,” said Ishmael Sessay, who has been harvesting timber from Sierra Leone’s oldest park since last year.

Logging for domestic use is allowed, but the government says logging in the park goes far beyond what is needed to satisfy home demand, and it does not have the resources to stop it.

“I feel pain in my heart when I see this forest cut,” said Musa Kamara, who worked as a ranger in the park from 1981 to 2018.

In a related development, Nigeria is facing life without oil revenue as oil prices, now around $20 a barrel, have already skidded to the zero point.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"But now the contraction in the Chinese economy has paused the illegal logging in the Outamba-Kilimi national park – more than 1,100 square km of park protected by 27 unarmed rangers.\r\n\r\n“No Chinese men are coming here anymore, and they’re the only people to come here and help us by buying what we cut,” said Ishmael Sessay, who has been harvesting timber from Sierra Leone’s oldest park since last year.\r\n\r\nLogging for domestic use is allowed, but the government says logging in the park goes far beyond what is needed to satisfy home demand, and it does not have the resources to stop it.\r\n\r\n“I feel pain in my heart when I see this forest cut,” said Musa Kamara, who worked as a ranger in the park from 1981 to 2018.\r\n\r\nIn a related development, Nigeria is facing life without oil revenue as oil prices, now around $20 a barrel, have already skidded to the zero point.\n\n”","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/05/37b8fc12-4b43-4efa-bb7f-d6649883f0441.png","ImageHeight":844,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"8AE22336-2FFA-41C4-8EFE-EC5C03161E26","SourceName":"The Charleston Chronicle","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.charlestonchronicle.net","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-17T21:39:40Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":53732,"FactUId":"4127EA1D-06D1-4B50-BEC9-873A34F92B28","Slug":"desecration-of-priceless-forests-in-sierra-leone-halted-by-coronavirus","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Desecration of Priceless Forests in Sierra Leone Halted by Coronavirus","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/desecration-of-priceless-forests-in-sierra-leone-halted-by-coronavirus","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/6982ddb9-33e1-469e-8344-2e6290cc3f69/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thoughtco.com%2Fafrican-american-history-4133344","DisplayText":"

Yoruba Americans are Americans of Yoruba descent. The Yoruba people (Yoruba: Àwọ̀n ọ́mọ́ Yorùbá) are an ethnic group originating in southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin in West Africa.

The first Yoruba people who arrived to the United States were imported as slaves from Nigeria and Benin during the Atlantic slave trade.[2] [3] This ethnicity of the slaves was one of the main origins of present-day Nigerians who arrived to the United States, along with the Igbo and Hausa. In addition, native slaves of current Benin hailed from peoples such as Nago (Yoruba subgroup,[4] although exported mainly by Spanish,[5] when Louisiana was Spanish) -, Ewe, Fon and Gen. Many of the slaves imported to the modern United States from Benin were sold by the King of Dahomey, in Whydah.[4] [6] [note 1]

The slaves brought with them their cultural practices, languages, cuisine[8] and religious beliefs rooted in spirit and ancestor worship.[9] So, the manners of the Yoruba, Fon, Gen and Ewe of Benin were key elements of Louisiana Voodoo.[10] Also Haitians, who migrated to Louisiana in the late nineteenth century and also contributed to Voodoo of this state, have the Yoruba[11] and Ewe as their main origins. The Yoruba, and some northern Nigerian ethnic groups, had tribal facial identification marks. These could have assisted a returning slave in relocating his or her ethnic group, but few slaves escaped the colonies. In the colonies, masters tried to dissuade the practice of tribal customs. They also sometimes mixed people of different ethnic groups to make it more difficult for them to communicate and bond together in rebellion.[12]

After the slavery abolition in 1865, many modern Nigerian immigrants have come to the United States to pursue educational opportunities in undergraduate and post-graduate institutions. This was possible because in the 1960s and 1970s, after the Biafra War, Nigerias government funded scholarships for Nigerian students, and many of them were admitted to American universities. While this was happening,

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Yoruba Americans are Americans of Yoruba descent. The Yoruba people (Yoruba: Àwọ̀n ọ́mọ́ Yorùbá) are an ethnic group originating in southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin in West Africa.\nThe first Yoruba people who arrived to the United States were imported as slaves from Nigeria and Benin during the Atlantic slave trade.[2] [3] This ethnicity of the slaves was one of the main origins of present-day Nigerians who arrived to the United States, along with the Igbo and Hausa. In addition, native slaves of current Benin hailed from peoples such as Nago (Yoruba subgroup,[4] although exported mainly by Spanish,[5] when Louisiana was Spanish) -, Ewe, Fon and Gen. Many of the slaves imported to the modern United States from Benin were sold by the King of Dahomey, in Whydah.[4] [6] [note 1] \nThe slaves brought with them their cultural practices, languages, cuisine[8] and religious beliefs rooted in spirit and ancestor worship.[9] So, the manners of the Yoruba, Fon, Gen and Ewe of Benin were key elements of Louisiana Voodoo.[10] Also Haitians, who migrated to Louisiana in the late nineteenth century and also contributed to Voodoo of this state, have the Yoruba[11] and Ewe as their main origins. The Yoruba, and some northern Nigerian ethnic groups, had tribal facial identification marks. These could have assisted a returning slave in relocating his or her ethnic group, but few slaves escaped the colonies. In the colonies, masters tried to dissuade the practice of tribal customs. They also sometimes mixed people of different ethnic groups to make it more difficult for them to communicate and bond together in rebellion.[12] \nAfter the slavery abolition in 1865, many modern Nigerian immigrants have come to the United States to pursue educational opportunities in undergraduate and post-graduate institutions. This was possible because in the 1960s and 1970s, after the Biafra War, Nigerias government funded scholarships for Nigerian students, and many of them were admitted to American universities. While this was happening,","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"6982DDB9-33E1-469E-8344-2E6290CC3F69","SourceName":"ThoughtCo","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.thoughtco.com/african-american-history-4133344","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":9530,"FactUId":"5F6CC450-0819-469F-827C-EB53B5FF067D","Slug":"yoruba-americans","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Yoruba Americans","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/yoruba-americans","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/08d2ee7c-809d-434b-917c-d2d660d50af2/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.theeastafrican.co.ke","DisplayText":"

Skywatchers along a narrow band from west Africa to the Arabian Peninsula, India and southern China will witness on Sunday the most dramatic \"ring of fire\" solar eclipse to shadow the Earth in years.

Annular eclipses occur when the Moon -- passing between Earth and the Sun -- is not quite close enough to our planet to completely obscure sunlight, leaving a thin ring of the solar disc visible.

Remarkably, the eclipse on Sunday arrives on the northern hemisphere's longest day of the year -- the summer solstice -- when Earth's north pole is tilted most directly towards the Sun.

The full eclipse will be visible somewhere on Earth during just under four hours, and one of the last places to see a partially hidden Sun is Taiwan before its path heads out into the Pacific.

A solar eclipse always occurs about two weeks before or after a lunar eclipse, when the Moon moves into Earth's shadow.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Skywatchers along a narrow band from west Africa to the Arabian Peninsula, India and southern China will witness on Sunday the most dramatic \"ring of fire\" solar eclipse to shadow the Earth in years.\r\n\r\nAnnular eclipses occur when the Moon -- passing between Earth and the Sun -- is not quite close enough to our planet to completely obscure sunlight, leaving a thin ring of the solar disc visible.\r\n\r\nRemarkably, the eclipse on Sunday arrives on the northern hemisphere's longest day of the year -- the summer solstice -- when Earth's north pole is tilted most directly towards the Sun.\r\n\r\nThe full eclipse will be visible somewhere on Earth during just under four hours, and one of the last places to see a partially hidden Sun is Taiwan before its path heads out into the Pacific.\r\n\r\nA solar eclipse always occurs about two weeks before or after a lunar eclipse, when the Moon moves into Earth's shadow.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/06/07e1d141-ab31-4680-aae9-71d00e541e951.png","ImageHeight":925,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"08D2EE7C-809D-434B-917C-D2D660D50AF2","SourceName":"The East African","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-20T07:06:28Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":69759,"FactUId":"7C34D8EE-87C2-43E9-8774-7321D89DD479","Slug":"rare-ring-of-fire-solar-eclipse-to-dim-africa-sunday","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Rare 'ring of fire' solar eclipse to dim Africa Sunday","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/rare-ring-of-fire-solar-eclipse-to-dim-africa-sunday","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/de2ecbf0-5aa4-45ce-bbf9-9a6ac45f6ac8/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blackpast.org%2F","DisplayText":"

In the following article Dr. Clarence Spigner, Professor of Public Health at the University of Washington, Seattle, describes the life of the first patient to die of Ebola on U.S. soil and the larger crisis of Ebola in West Africa.  He views it as a consequence of a long history of disease, poverty, and underfunded health care systems in the West African nations of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia which are at the center of the 2014 epidemic. 

On September 20, 2014, a forty-two year-old Liberian native, Thomas Eric Duncan, arrived in Dallas, Texas from a plane flight that originated in Monrovia, Liberia.  Duncan came to the United States ostensibly to reunite with his estranged teenaged son and the boy’s mother, Louise Troh, who had at one time been his girlfriend in Liberia.  Troh and her son lived in Dallas.

Unknown before that point, Duncan entered the international public consciousness because he had flown from the hot zone of the Ebola virus outbreak then occurring in West Africa. On March 30, 2014, Liberia reported two cases of people with the Ebola disease.  Six months later on September 30, over 3,000 people had died from Ebola in West Africa including more than 1,000 in Liberia alone.  Duncan, who would be the first reported case of Ebola in the United States and as of this writing, the only fatality, was symptom-free and not contagious when he left Liberia by way of Brussels, Belgium and Washington, D.C.

The deadly Ebola disease has symptoms similar to the mosquito-borne infectious malaria.  Both malaria and Ebola are endemic to Africa, though malaria is now far more widespread and dangerous.  So is West Nile Disease which like malaria is mosquito-borne and was first identified in 1937 in the East African nation of Uganda. 

Unlike those diseases, Ebola is spread by physical contact with an infected person or animal.  The virus is not airborne.  The rapid spread of Ebola and the even more rapid spread of fear of a worldwide distribution of the Ebola virus comes from the knowledge that diseases like

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"In the following article Dr. Clarence Spigner, Professor of Public Health at the University of Washington, Seattle, describes the life of the first patient to die of Ebola on U.S. soil and the larger crisis of Ebola in West Africa.  He views it as a consequence of a long history of disease, poverty, and underfunded health care systems in the West African nations of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia which are at the center of the 2014 epidemic.  \nOn September 20, 2014, a forty-two year-old Liberian native, Thomas Eric Duncan, arrived in Dallas, Texas from a plane flight that originated in Monrovia, Liberia.  Duncan came to the United States ostensibly to reunite with his estranged teenaged son and the boy’s mother, Louise Troh, who had at one time been his girlfriend in Liberia.  Troh and her son lived in Dallas.\nUnknown before that point, Duncan entered the international public consciousness because he had flown from the hot zone of the Ebola virus outbreak then occurring in West Africa. On March 30, 2014, Liberia reported two cases of people with the Ebola disease.  Six months later on September 30, over 3,000 people had died from Ebola in West Africa including more than 1,000 in Liberia alone.  Duncan, who would be the first reported case of Ebola in the United States and as of this writing, the only fatality, was symptom-free and not contagious when he left Liberia by way of Brussels, Belgium and Washington, D.C. \nThe deadly Ebola disease has symptoms similar to the mosquito-borne infectious malaria.  Both malaria and Ebola are endemic to Africa, though malaria is now far more widespread and dangerous.  So is West Nile Disease which like malaria is mosquito-borne and was first identified in 1937 in the East African nation of Uganda.  \nUnlike those diseases, Ebola is spread by physical contact with an infected person or animal.  The virus is not airborne.  The rapid spread of Ebola and the even more rapid spread of fear of a worldwide distribution of the Ebola virus comes from the knowledge that diseases like","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.blackpast.org/files/thomas_eric_duncan_at_a_party_in_monrovia__liberia__2011.jpg","ImageHeight":365,"ImageWidth":220,"ImageOrientation":"portrait","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"DE2ECBF0-5AA4-45CE-BBF9-9A6AC45F6AC8","SourceName":"Black Past","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.blackpast.org/","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":7690,"FactUId":"FA201DBA-689D-4DED-8838-C0198EB77192","Slug":"patient-zero-thomas-eric-duncan-and-the-ebola-crisis-in-west-africa-and-the-united-states","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Patient Zero: Thomas Eric Duncan and the Ebola Crisis in West Africa and the United States","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/patient-zero-thomas-eric-duncan-and-the-ebola-crisis-in-west-africa-and-the-united-states","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/ba8cd304-6b2c-4c96-b969-a837090ad7f7/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com","DisplayText":"

This greater need for peacekeeping efforts offers an opportunity for the UN to explore a real spectrum of peace operations beyond the large multidimensional model.

Unlike recent closures in Liberia and Côte d'Ivoire - where missions ended following successful peace processes - those in Darfur and Congo will be leaving with far greater risks of relapse into large-scale violence.

The UN should treat the current COVID-19 crisis as an opportunity to transform its approach to peace operations.

Models without a military component exist, including the peacebuilding mission in Guinea-Bissau, the new political mission in Haiti, the regional prevention work of the UN Office for West Africa and the Sahel, and a range of successful conflict prevention initiatives by the UN in non-mission settings.

As the UN reflects on 72 years of peacekeeping, it should not be consumed with how to draw down its big operations or how to survive with its current models.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"This greater need for peacekeeping efforts offers an opportunity for the UN to explore a real spectrum of peace operations beyond the large multidimensional model.\r\n\r\nUnlike recent closures in Liberia and Côte d'Ivoire - where missions ended following successful peace processes - those in Darfur and Congo will be leaving with far greater risks of relapse into large-scale violence.\r\n\r\nThe UN should treat the current COVID-19 crisis as an opportunity to transform its approach to peace operations.\r\n\r\nModels without a military component exist, including the peacebuilding mission in Guinea-Bissau, the new political mission in Haiti, the regional prevention work of the UN Office for West Africa and the Sahel, and a range of successful conflict prevention initiatives by the UN in non-mission settings.\r\n\r\nAs the UN reflects on 72 years of peacekeeping, it should not be consumed with how to draw down its big operations or how to survive with its current models.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"BA8CD304-6B2C-4C96-B969-A837090AD7F7","SourceName":"allAfrica.com","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://allafrica.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-29T14:18:32Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":59492,"FactUId":"0722E29B-D0F1-43E0-8E94-7A5805878167","Slug":"africa-why-covid-19-offers-a-chance-to-transform-un-peacekeeping","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Africa: Why COVID-19 Offers a Chance to Transform UN Peacekeeping","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/africa-why-covid-19-offers-a-chance-to-transform-un-peacekeeping","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/e00aab25-8364-4338-82f2-e8bab2a18c68/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.news24.com","DisplayText":"

The possible return of former Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo to the Côte d’Ivoire after his acquittal on charges of crimes against humanity might well be the catalyst for negotiations in that country, argues Thabo Mbeki.

These decisions concern the future of Mr Laurent Gbagbo, former President of Côte d’Ivoire.

Mr Gbagbo served as President of Côte d’Ivoire from 26 October, 2000 until 2011.

The Forum therefore pleaded with the ICC Prosecutor, Ms Bensouda, to withdraw the charges against Mr Gbagbo and therefore allow him to return home to contribute everything in his power to the achievement of the said national reconciliation.

Mr Bedie, himself a former President of Côte d’Ivoire, supported Mr Ouattara during the 2010 and 2015 Presidential elections and his party served in the Ouattara governments in coalition with President Ouattara’s RDR.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"The possible return of former Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo to the Côte d’Ivoire after his acquittal on charges of crimes against humanity might well be the catalyst for negotiations in that country, argues Thabo Mbeki.\r\n\r\nThese decisions concern the future of Mr Laurent Gbagbo, former President of Côte d’Ivoire.\r\n\r\nMr Gbagbo served as President of Côte d’Ivoire from 26 October, 2000 until 2011.\r\n\r\nThe Forum therefore pleaded with the ICC Prosecutor, Ms Bensouda, to withdraw the charges against Mr Gbagbo and therefore allow him to return home to contribute everything in his power to the achievement of the said national reconciliation.\r\n\r\nMr Bedie, himself a former President of Côte d’Ivoire, supported Mr Ouattara during the 2010 and 2015 Presidential elections and his party served in the Ouattara governments in coalition with President Ouattara’s RDR.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/06/849d0e0a-331b-4711-a8ec-fac8afa193e61.png","ImageHeight":1000,"ImageWidth":1500,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"E00AAB25-8364-4338-82F2-E8BAB2A18C68","SourceName":"https://www.news24.com","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://www.news24.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-06-02T17:23:46Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":62027,"FactUId":"065B9FDD-3EC4-4CCC-8774-DFA305FFFCCC","Slug":"thabo-mbeki-it-is-time-for-c-te-d-ivoire-to-cross-the-rubicon","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Thabo Mbeki: It is time for Côte d’Ivoire to cross the Rubicon","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/thabo-mbeki-it-is-time-for-c-te-d-ivoire-to-cross-the-rubicon","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":false,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/105cfd01-e36c-4387-999d-6c14790e2a3c/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fedmontonjournal.com","DisplayText":"

By the time of her death at the age of 31, Phillis Wheatley was among the most celebrated poets of her time.

She had also been a slave, bought in West Africa and brought to Boston in 1761 as a child then resold to the Wheatley family, where she was tutored …

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"By the time of her death at the age of 31, Phillis Wheatley was among the most celebrated poets of her time.\n She had also been a slave, bought in West Africa and brought to Boston in 1761 as a child then resold to the Wheatley family, where she was tutored …","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/2020/12/d1e53870-be97-4c13-967e-5956e10a5d86.jpg","ImageHeight":750,"ImageWidth":1000,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"105CFD01-E36C-4387-999D-6C14790E2A3C","SourceName":"Edmonton Journal","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://edmontonjournal.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"date\":\"2020-12-02T15:46:47Z\"}","JsonExtData":{"date":{"ValueKind":3}},"Id":208916,"FactUId":"7A92BFCC-A690-436C-9834-51880B145146","Slug":"edmonton-author-celebrates-historic-african-american-poet-in-new-book","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Edmonton author celebrates historic African-American poet in new book","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/edmonton-author-celebrates-historic-african-american-poet-in-new-book","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/5228ac88-a81b-4faa-956e-1f0c78cf63fd/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fyourblackworld.net","DisplayText":"

As black America remains under an ongoing murderous and unrelenting police occupation, black social scientists have continued performing their much-needed work as the demand for true justice grows by the day.

In these countless numbers of cases, police officers (predominantly white males) have even slaughtered black America’s women (Sandra Bland, Texas) and children (Tamir Rice, Ohio).

The 22-page report on this study examines black oppression by society-at-large, poverty, and the downright criminal element within America’s primarily white male-dominated local police forces.

Hitchens and her two other co-authors also provide the empirical data that is needed to fully understand the impact of black America’s nightmarish reality.

The hundreds of years that highlight the oppression of blacks in America is nothing short of devilish and vile.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"As black America remains under an ongoing murderous and unrelenting police occupation, black social scientists have continued performing their much-needed work as the demand for true justice grows by the day.\r\n\r\nIn these countless numbers of cases, police officers (predominantly white males) have even slaughtered black America’s women (Sandra Bland, Texas) and children (Tamir Rice, Ohio).\r\n\r\nThe 22-page report on this study examines black oppression by society-at-large, poverty, and the downright criminal element within America’s primarily white male-dominated local police forces.\r\n\r\nHitchens and her two other co-authors also provide the empirical data that is needed to fully understand the impact of black America’s nightmarish reality.\r\n\r\nThe hundreds of years that highlight the oppression of blacks in America is nothing short of devilish and vile.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"5228AC88-A81B-4FAA-956E-1F0C78CF63FD","SourceName":"Your Black World","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://yourblackworld.net","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-27T11:27:08Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":59423,"FactUId":"8323FFAF-8203-421F-9964-DC817ACA268A","Slug":"why-i-can-t-stand-out-in-front-of-my-house-a-study-about-black-poverty-oppression-and-police","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"“Why I Can’t Stand Out in Front of My House?”: A Study About Black Poverty, Oppression, and Police","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/why-i-can-t-stand-out-in-front-of-my-house-a-study-about-black-poverty-oppression-and-police","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/Sponsor/becbe15c-72a7-4130-b8db-a12eaf26b3ab/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nyu.edu","SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/de2ecbf0-5aa4-45ce-bbf9-9a6ac45f6ac8/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blackpast.org%2F","DisplayText":"

Alice Nkom broke barriers for women by becoming the first female barrister in her country of Cameroon. She is also well known among Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) activists worldwide because of her legal advocacy for gay rights.

Nkom was born in 1945 in Poutkak, Cameroon in West Africa to Martin Nkom Bayi and Alice Ngo Bikang. She was one of eleven children. Nkom pursued higher education in France at the University of Toulouse (1963-1964) and completed her studies at the Federal University of Cameroon (1968). In 1969 at the age of 24 she became Cameroon’s first female attorney.  Throughout her law career Nkom has defended low income and vulnerable people, including political prisoners, street children and women. Since 1976, she has been a stakeholder in one of the most prestigious law firms in Cameroon. After seven years of marriage, Nkom went through a divorce in 1979. She has two children, Charles and Stephane, and eight grandchildren.

The year 2003 was pivotal for Nkom. As a delegate from Cameroon, she visited Portland, Oregon as a participant in the World Affairs Council’s International Visitor Program sponsored by the U.S State Department. She returned to Portland in 2011 as a distinguished alumnus of that program. Her experiences in Oregon opened her eyes to the power of participatory democracy, community organizing and youth involvement in politics. Back home she engaged young people and women in voter registration. This work continues.

In 2003 in an effort to provide support and legal defense to LGBTQ persons in Cameroon, Nkom founded the nonprofit Association for the Defence of Homosexuals (ADEFHO). No other group does this pro bono advocacy work in her country or the rest of Western Africa. In Cameroon, engaging in same-gender sexual acts can lead to fines and imprisonment. Many of the people are arrested on rumor.

By 2011, Nkom had participated in 50 trials of LGBTQ people and facilitated the release of an additional 50 clients without trials. That same year the European Union

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"Alice Nkom broke barriers for women by becoming the first female barrister in her country of Cameroon. She is also well known among Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) activists worldwide because of her legal advocacy for gay rights. \nNkom was born in 1945 in Poutkak, Cameroon in West Africa to Martin Nkom Bayi and Alice Ngo Bikang. She was one of eleven children. Nkom pursued higher education in France at the University of Toulouse (1963-1964) and completed her studies at the Federal University of Cameroon (1968). In 1969 at the age of 24 she became Cameroon’s first female attorney.  Throughout her law career Nkom has defended low income and vulnerable people, including political prisoners, street children and women. Since 1976, she has been a stakeholder in one of the most prestigious law firms in Cameroon. After seven years of marriage, Nkom went through a divorce in 1979. She has two children, Charles and Stephane, and eight grandchildren.\nThe year 2003 was pivotal for Nkom. As a delegate from Cameroon, she visited Portland, Oregon as a participant in the World Affairs Council’s International Visitor Program sponsored by the U.S State Department. She returned to Portland in 2011 as a distinguished alumnus of that program. Her experiences in Oregon opened her eyes to the power of participatory democracy, community organizing and youth involvement in politics. Back home she engaged young people and women in voter registration. This work continues.\nIn 2003 in an effort to provide support and legal defense to LGBTQ persons in Cameroon, Nkom founded the nonprofit Association for the Defence of Homosexuals (ADEFHO). No other group does this pro bono advocacy work in her country or the rest of Western Africa. In Cameroon, engaging in same-gender sexual acts can lead to fines and imprisonment. Many of the people are arrested on rumor. \nBy 2011, Nkom had participated in 50 trials of LGBTQ people and facilitated the release of an additional 50 clients without trials. That same year the European Union","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":"https://blackfactsblobstorage.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/blackfacts/facts/www.blackpast.org/files/blackpast_images/alice_nkom.jpg","ImageHeight":225,"ImageWidth":300,"ImageOrientation":"landscape","HasImage":true,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"DE2ECBF0-5AA4-45CE-BBF9-9A6AC45F6AC8","SourceName":"Black Past","ContentSourceRootUrl":"http://www.blackpast.org/","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":"BECBE15C-72A7-4130-B8DB-A12EAF26B3AB","IsSponsored":true,"SponsorName":"New York University","SmallSponsorLogoUrl":"24x24/nyu-logo.jpg","SponsorUrl":"https://www.nyu.edu","HasSmallSponsorLogo":true,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":"ExtractionBotHub","IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{}","JsonExtData":{},"Id":4356,"FactUId":"8BD2FA44-0974-44CE-8CFA-A2920167137B","Slug":"nkom-alice-1945","FactType":"Article","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Nkom, Alice (1945- )","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/nkom-alice-1945","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/ba8cd304-6b2c-4c96-b969-a837090ad7f7/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/https%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com","DisplayText":"

The Ministry of Aviation has re-affirmed that the Ghana Airports Company Limited (GACL) has no contract with LCB Worldwide Ghana Limited, a local crisis management company, for the disinfection of airports in the country.

Addressing a press conference in Accra yesterday, he indicated that, although LCB Worldwide presented a proposal to the GACL on disinfection of the country's airports, the cost implications was unbearable for the GACL saying that, it was erroneous for anyone to suggest that a non-existing contract had been diverted.

Under this proposal to GACL, the US$19 million cost of the disinfection was to be recovered through a US$20 levy on domestic and international air passengers,\" he added.

Even before the proposal, Mr Adda explained that the Ministry and GACL were considering disinfection of airports adding that an alternative company was given the approval to undertake the exercise using laid down government policy and due process.

In furtherance of the safety and security protocols at Ghana's airports and make Ghana an aviation hub, the Minister noted that the Ministry was ready to partner with any company with the required capacity.

","ShowFullContent":false,"FactText":null,"FactUrl":null,"RelatedIds":null,"JsonImages":null,"JsonVideos":null,"JsonAudios":null,"JsonCategories":null,"JsonConcepts":null,"JsonPeople":null,"JsonOrganizations":null,"JsonPlaces":null,"JsonAuthors":null,"JsonChannels":null,"JsonKeywords":null,"JsonHashtags":null,"JsonRelatedFacts":null,"OGImageUrl":null,"OGImageWidth":null,"OGImageHeight":null,"FavIconUrl":null,"FavIconWidth":null,"FavIconHeight":null,"IsLocal":false,"Type":null,"SummaryText":"The Ministry of Aviation has re-affirmed that the Ghana Airports Company Limited (GACL) has no contract with LCB Worldwide Ghana Limited, a local crisis management company, for the disinfection of airports in the country.\r\n\r\nAddressing a press conference in Accra yesterday, he indicated that, although LCB Worldwide presented a proposal to the GACL on disinfection of the country's airports, the cost implications was unbearable for the GACL saying that, it was erroneous for anyone to suggest that a non-existing contract had been diverted.\r\n\r\nUnder this proposal to GACL, the US$19 million cost of the disinfection was to be recovered through a US$20 levy on domestic and international air passengers,\" he added.\r\n\r\nEven before the proposal, Mr Adda explained that the Ministry and GACL were considering disinfection of airports adding that an alternative company was given the approval to undertake the exercise using laid down government policy and due process.\r\n\r\nIn furtherance of the safety and security protocols at Ghana's airports and make Ghana an aviation hub, the Minister noted that the Ministry was ready to partner with any company with the required capacity.","MaxDetailCharacters":300,"ImageUrl":null,"ImageHeight":null,"ImageWidth":null,"ImageOrientation":"none","HasImage":false,"CssClass":"","Layout":"","Rowspan":1,"Colspan":1,"Likes":0,"Shares":0,"ContentSourceId":"BA8CD304-6B2C-4C96-B969-A837090AD7F7","SourceName":"allAfrica.com","ContentSourceRootUrl":"https://allafrica.com","ContentSourceIcon":null,"SponsorId":null,"IsSponsored":false,"SponsorName":null,"SmallSponsorLogoUrl":null,"SponsorUrl":null,"HasSmallSponsorLogo":false,"EffectiveDate":null,"HasEffectiveDate":false,"MonthAbbrevName":null,"FormattedDate":null,"Year":null,"Month":null,"Day":null,"LastUpdatedDate":"2021-05-04T16:13:35.62","LastUpdatedBy":null,"IsEditable":false,"InsertAd":false,"JSONFactData":"{\"IsPublishDate\":true,\"Date\":\"2020-05-22T11:03:18Z\",\"Month\":null,\"Day\":null,\"Year\":null}","JsonExtData":{"isPublishDate":{"ValueKind":5},"date":{"ValueKind":3},"month":null,"day":null,"year":null},"Id":55947,"FactUId":"2F0A5B95-089F-4C0E-94FE-2F5400A277A9","Slug":"ghana-aviation-ministry-has-no-contract-with-lcb-worldwide-ghana-limited--minister","FactType":"News","VirtualSiteSlug":"blackfacts","Title":"Ghana: Aviation Ministry Has No Contract With LCB Worldwide Ghana Limited - Minister","LocalFactUrl":"/fact/ghana-aviation-ministry-has-no-contract-with-lcb-worldwide-ghana-limited--minister","ResultCount":200,"SearchType":"OmniSearch.RelatedId"},{"FadeSummary":true,"SponsorRedirectUrl":null,"SourceRedirectUrl":"https://ai.blackfacts.com/redirect/ContentSource/42c8fac1-e2c7-4a09-8ca5-16c843dec99e/06f29f6e-bbf1-486b-82e1-fdf5b7a11f99/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.africanews.com","DisplayText":"

Sierra Leone more than doubled its coronavirus cases in the last 10 days (April 20 – 30 from 64 cases to 124).

April 21: President Bio enters in quarantine

\tSierra Leone president Julius Maada Bio is to undergo 14-day self-isolation after one of his bodyguards tested positive for COVID-19, reports from the West African country indicated as of Monday evening.

March 31: Sierra Leone confirms index case

\tSierra Leone president Julius Maada Bio has confirmed that the country has its first case of COVID-19, multiple media outlets in the West African country have confirmed.

March 27: Sierra Leone closes borders for 30 days

\tVirus-free Sierra Leone on Friday announced closure of its borders for a 30-day period barely days after President Julius Maada Bio announced a state of public health emergency.

VIDEO

March 24: President Maada Bio declares 12-month state of Public Health emergency

\tDespite being among 11 African countries that have not recorded any cases of the coronavirus, Sierra Leone president Julius Maada Bio has imposed a twelve-month state of public health emergency effe

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