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William Plomer

William Plomer , (born Dec. 10, 1903, Transvaal, S.Af.—died Sept. 21, 1973, Lewes, East Sussex, Eng.), South African-born British man of letters, whose writing covered many genres: poetry, novels, short stories, memoirs, and even opera librettos.

Plomer was educated in England but returned with his family to South Africa after World War I. His experience as an apprentice on a remote farm in the eastern Cape when he was 17 alerted him to the literary possibilities of the South African landscape and established the sensibility of his early works. His first novel, Turbott Wolfe (1925), caused a scandal because it touched upon miscegenation and dared to criticize the supposed benevolence of whites toward blacks, even casting some white characters in the role of villains. I Speak of Africa (1927), a collection of short stories, exacerbated his reputation. In collaboration with Laurens Van Der Post and the iconoclastic poet Roy Campbell, he founded a magazine called Voorslag (“Whiplash”) with which he intended to excoriate South African racist society. Public outrage silenced the journal, and Plomer and Campbell left the country.

Plomer travelled in Japan and Europe before returning to England, where to all intents he became a British man of letters, though some of his work continued to draw upon his travels. In England he wrote two dramatic novels about London, The Case Is Altered (1932) and The Invaders (1934). Additional publications included a semifictional memoir, Museum Pieces (1952), and three volumes of family and personal memoirs, Double Lives (1943), At Home (1958), and Autobiography of William Plomer (1975). Between 1938 and 1940 he edited three volumes of the diaries of the Victorian clergyman Francis Kilvert. His association with the British composer Benjamin Britten began with the opera Gloriana (1953) and continued with librettos for the cantatas Curlew River (1964), The Burning Fiery Furnace (1966), and Prodigal Son (1968). One of his major achievements was Collected Poems (1960).

His assimilation

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